Yolanda funds? Nasaan?

What are the funds?

The Yolanda funds can be grouped into two:

  1. the promised donations from foreign governments; and
  2. the budget allotted by the national government.

These two funds are very different from each other.

Foreign Aid.

The promised donations made by foreign governments are documented in FAITH, the Philippine government’s “Foreign Aid Transparency Hub”.

Donor countries are the ones that directly provide the information on the donations.

This information has been public since Nov. 14, 2013 – just one week after the storm.

The gist of the story: only 25% of the total amount has been delivered.

Who has the amount been delivered to?

According to Faith:

“Foreign assistance is not often received in cash form by the Philippine government.

Most donors opt to release pledged funds to affiliated intergovernmental organizations and NGOs (nongovernment organizations).

For instance, the UK government has channeled substantial funds to UNICEF and the Red Cross.

Foreign governments may also extend aid through their own aid agencies, such as USAID for the US.

Alternatively, a donor country may utilize their pledged funds to directly provide assistance in the form of civilian-military teams and assets, as in the deployment of the 148-person Israeli Defense Forces Rescue Team.”

Note that Mar was DILG Secretary during the time of supertyphoon Yolanda. None of the foreign aid-“Yolanda funds” passed through his office.

All of these foreign aid-“Yolanda funds” are accounted for. Palace Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. had this to say:

According to the records of the Foreign Aid Transparency Hub, the Philippines received a total of $386.2 million in foreign aid, 86% of which or $330.8 million were received by non-governmental organizations, multilateral agencies, and others. Out of the total amount, about $26.9 million in cash and $28.5 million in non-cash donations were received by the national government.

All foreign aid received by the country for the benefit of the communities affected by Super Typhoon Yolanda are fully accounted for and have undergone the requisite audit by the Commission on Audit.

How has the amount been used?

With respect to cash aid that the Philippine government has actually received from foreign governments:

“The DSWD uses the aid money for disaster relief and early rehabilitation, which may involve cash-for-work arrangements, shelter repair kits, and shelter assistance, among others.

The NDRRMC, through the OCD, allocates financial aid to disaster victims

The DOH focuses on providing medical aid as relief response.”

Data on funds for Yolanda projects is available online.

PH Gov’t Rehabilitation Aid.

The “Philippine government” Yolanda funds actually handled by Mar’s office as DILG Secretary was the RAY fund or the DILG’s “Recovery Assistance on Yolanda.”

The national government allocated amounts – in batches – for the repair and rehabilitation of damaged municipal facilities. These include:

  1. provincial/city/municipal halls,
  2. public markets and
  3. civic centers.

In Region 8, this included fixing DILG offices – the PNP, the BFP,and the BJMP.

Examples of how RAY has helped the local governments affected can be seen in a downloadable coffee book.

RAY was only part of the national government’s relief efforts:

Of the nearly P1.8 billion initial rehabilitation fund for towns devastated by Typhoon Yolanda, a huge chunk went to Leyte and its capital Tacloban

 

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15 thoughts on “Yolanda funds? Nasaan?”

    1. Here in Tacloban after Yolanda struck, there was a radio station primarily established by the different NGO’s to announce the assistance to be provided to the victims. It was mentioned that the $100 million dollar donations were divided among the NGOs.

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  1. It’s so saddening that a lot of people,,reacted negatively at once,, without even giving ample time to read and digest the content of the headlines they saw,, they hastely jump into conclusion without even digging deeper into the issue,,,most of the time the headlines shown on tv and newspapers can give negative thoughts , especially f the viewers don’t bother to listen/ read the whole details before concluding.. Thus the reputations of certain people/ government agencies involved were smeared,,, this so-called yolanda fund has already done it’s effect to a lot of people,,, birthed a lot of negative comments due to inappropriate informations…. 😦 in the end it’s not just the reputation of that particular person /government agency’s affected but the reputation of the Filipino people…

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  2. I am very much involved in the restoration of distribution lines damaged of typhoon yolanda which commenced right after the typhoon left and up to its completion 6 months thereafter. The restoration of the distribution lines, which were less appreciated by many, was the most fastest in the delivery/reconstruction, efficient and graft free. I know it because Im there. While other agencies and NGOs are still planning or surveying what to contribute in the infra aspect, our work on the restoration are already complete by April 2014.

    If many recall, then Sec. Icot Petilla even tendered his resignation on Dec. 26, 2013 when a few municipalities were not energized by Dec 25, 2013 but PNoy convinced him to withdraw it as it was only 1% of the total energised municipalities.

    The T. Yolanda funds has clearly contributed to the recovery of the many devastated municipalities in Leyte-Samar, Bantayan Island, Northern Iloilo, Capiz, and other places. The exception however was in the restoration and rehabilitation of Tacloban City yet it was still restored or rehabilitated. Right now, almost all facilities – public buildings, schools, state universities, numerous relocation sites and houses, communication, water utilities, public roads and many other projects were already restored.

    If Yolanda funds were not properly utilized in the restoration or rehabilitation, indeed many victims of typhoon yolanda could have already migrated in Metro Manila or other big cities either begging or rallying for food and shelter. But as you see, there is none begging in Metro Manila that are Yolanda victims. Credit shall be given to PNoys administration and even to Mar.

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    1. I am very much involved in the restoration of distribution lines damaged of typhoon Yolanda which commenced right after the typhoon left and up to its completion 6 months thereafter. The restoration of the distribution lines, which were less appreciated by many, was the most fastest in the delivery/reconstruction, efficient and graft free. I know it because Im there. While other agencies and NGOs are still planning or surveying what to contribute in the infra aspect, our work on the restoration are already complete by April 2014.
      If many recall, then Sec. Icot Petilla even tendered his resignation on Dec. 26, 2013 when a few municipalities were not energized by Dec 25, 2013 but PNoy convinced him to withdraw it as it was only 1% of the total energised municipalities.
      The T. Yolanda funds has clearly contributed to the recovery of the many devastated municipalities in Leyte-Samar, Bantayan Island, Northern Iloilo, Capiz, and other places. The exception however was in the restoration and rehabilitation of Tacloban City yet it was still restored or rehabilitated. Right now, almost all facilities – public buildings, schools, state universities, numerous relocation sites and houses, communication, water utilities, public roads and many other projects were already restored.
      If Yolanda funds were not properly utilized in the restoration or rehabilitation, indeed many victims of typhoon yolanda could have already migrated in Metro Manila or other big cities either begging or rallying for food and shelter. But as you see, there is none begging in Metro Manila that are Yolanda victims. Credit shall be given to PNoys administration and even to Mar.

      Like

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